Tag Archives: Maxxis IT Desert tyre

CRF250L Southwest USA – Gear Review

monu03Like the CRF250L itself, I use longer rides to try out new stuff, new ways of doing things or whatever else catches my imagination.
Below is the equipment roll call from the 2013 Honda ride around Southwest USA. What worked, what didn’t and why. The prices given in £ or $ are what I paid for the gear or what it cost.
 Some items like Kriega, Magadans, Trailtech and Aero stuff has been supplied to me over the years in exchange for adverts in the book.

clapAdventure Spec Magadan bags – £330
No complains about my Magbags; the best soft bag out there for my sort of riding. Simple and functional, great capacity, big external pockets and tough fabric. It didn’t rain enough on this trip to test them, but it lashed down on previous UK rides with no leakage, even through the fabric outer, let alone the thick PVC liners. Requires a rack but that’s the way it should be for heavy loads in soft bags. More on the Mags here.
Verdict: regret giving these away with the CRF.

Aerostich wool seat pad – $67
crgr-padI used this last year in Morocco on a BMW 650 twin which has a seat straight out of Enhanced Interrogation; sadly the Aeropad couldn’t save it – three inches of Moroccan mattress foam did (below). On the Honda the wool pad may have taken the edge off, giving another hour’s comfort but I actually found P1050444frequent dismounts were as effective to posterior durability. Another interesting thing: mostly I rode in my leather jeans but one hot day I wore thinner (slipperier?) synthetic 5-11 Tactical trousers (great gear btw, much tougher than ‘outdoor rec’ stuff). Result: sore arse arrived very soon.
I also found the wool would pack down and lose its loft after a few long days, but could be easily washed and ruffled up. And after a night in the rain a vigorous rub dispersed most of the moisture.
Verdict: seemingly minimal improvement but can’t do any harm.

AlphaAAlpha Three tail rack – on bike
Never heard of Alpha Three – could be Japanese rather than Chinese? – but this ‘Type A’ item was a neat little rack with  downward pointing prongs incorporating hexhead bolts to securely attach stuff, should you wish.
A tendency has developed towards racks cut out of flat metal sheets, either thick alloy or thin galvanized steel. Reason: cheaper manufacturing costs not necessarily reflected in the retail price as they’re the latest ‘thing’. Smaller ‘plate racks’ the size of the Alpha might be fine but some of the wider ones as tested in Overland Journal (Fall 2012) have nasty thin edges that I wouldn’t want to meet while tumbling down a slope, even though I’m all for wide ‘sheep racks’ in principle. Conventional tube racks are easier to use and grip, when needed. There are a few more CRF-L rack options listed here.
Verdict: a slick and well-featured tail rack.

Barkbuster Storm handguards – $130
crgr-barkAlways liked the Aussie-made BBs and even though cheaper versions are available I splashed out at more tolerable US prices US prices on some Barks with the biggest Storm handguards to keep for later. Cheapies often don’t fit so well; the key I believe is the articulated joint (available separately) at the inboard mounting end. Cheaper versions off ebay have no joint – less easy to position optimally. I like to think the Storm handguards kept my hands warmer and drier and so deferred the need for heavy gloves – I always prefer thin unlined gloves. The only time I fell off the Barks did their job, although one drawback with all lever guards is you can’t hang stuff, including a helmet, so easily off the bar ends. I’ve fitted bungy hooks on previous bikes.
Verdict: worth paying out and keeping for the next bike.

crgr-bashBashplate – came on bike
I omitted to note what brand it was – Ricochet is a name that bounces around the forums. Engine protection is a no brainer of course, even if I only dinged it once on the gnarly Lockhart Basin track. The fit was fine – no exposed bolts on the underside and a hole to enable drain plug access without removal. But clamped directly to the frame rails I found the resonance intrusive. I reduced that by refitting the plate with some strips of closed cell foam (karrimat) on the frame rails. Like others, I also think a bit more width to either side would improve protection of the filter housing and bottom hose.
Verdict: As usual, the OE plastic plate is a joke. Essential for off highway riding.

Bell Mag 9 helmet – $70
Probably discontinued by now but great lid for the money. Full review here.

Benchmark atlases – $15 
crgr-watrbenchI’ve been using these for years in the US and on this trip they came into their own for riding off pavement across Nevada and Utah. Yes they’re big to carry on a bike and may well be available as a tablet app, but give me a paper map any day for getting the big picture. I barely use the additional guidebook-like recreational info you get in a Benchmark but it’s good to know it’s there.
crgr-bencherAs with all paper maps, dirt road accuracy got a bit mushy at times, and here I found the US-sourced Garmin satnav filled in the gaps. And then when the satnav was wanting, just like a proper map I could read a long-lat easily off my Garmin 62 against the Benchmark’s incremental long-lat grid (above) to find exactly where I was.
Verdict: I’ve tried Delormes but Benchmarks are to the US what OS maps are to the UK.

crgr-mirrorDouble Take mirrors – $100 pair!
A mate had these in Morocco last year and I admit I fell for the hype – or wanted to see if they lived up to it. At over $100 a pair (iirc) the RAM ball-mounted DT mirrors provided infinite positioning and crash-proof toughness. I took one and left the OE Honda mirror on the nearside (on the right side in the picture, left) but soon wished I’d either kept both Hondas or ran them the other way round. For seeing what’s behind you the OE Honda was a better mirror – bigger (wider), clearer and immune to vibration or movement. That was until my single, low-speed fall on the right side when the Honda glass shattered in the otherwise undamaged plastic housing. Honda dealers at the time only sold the whole mirror assembly which had to be ordered.
Perhaps they’re suited to more aggressive off-roading where falls are more frequent, but where you probably want mirrors to get to your riding location. Here a Double Take or the like soon pays for itself, although I found at road speeds it blurred too much to be reliable and moved around on the dirt or in strong headwinds, no matter how hard I clamped it. And with that nifty mirror-base RAM mounts they are rather nickable; RAM’s theft-proof clamp is not the slickest design.
Verdict: built for crashing, but on the Honda less good for seeing.

EJK fuel controller – on bike
cf-ejkred45I’ve had 4×4 turbo-diesel engines ‘chipped’ through I never knew exactly what was being done – it seemed to be one  unprogrammable map and the sort of performance chasing meddling that doesn’t  interest me that much.
For petrol engines EJK’s fuel controller is a bit more sophisticated: an ‘electronic jet kit’ enabling you to increase fuel delivery (richen the mixture) as you experiment with performance enhancement. Short version: at $200 a useful bit of kit to experiment with or optimise the mixture; long version here.
Verdict: another good reason to bid adios to carbs.

crgr-pipesFMF Q4 pipe + Megabomb header – on bike (sold for $350)
The bike came with this set up the suitably calibrated EJK (above) and holes in the airbox, but one day’s dirt riding convinced me the Q was not at all Quiet and would have driven me nuts on the long road. Even at double the weight I was happy to refit the weighty OE cat silencer and flogged the FMF set up.
Verdict: way too noisy and can’t say I noticed any significant power loss once removed.

morpas09Garmin GPS 60CSx – £160 used
I used the bulkier GPSMap 72 for years to log tracks for my off-roading guidebooks until it started playing up. I was happy to replace it with the more compact and popular 60 series using the similarly intuitive interface. This one had Utah topo maps on it and took the UTBDR tracklog without any undue gnashing of teeth. And  a RAM cradle mount performed securely without vibration issues.
Verdict: CSx not made any more but still preferable to touch screen Montana/Oregons.

Garmin Nuvi LM50  – $80 used
crgr-nuviI hoped that a US-sourced Nuvi would have maps which featured the countless miles of unsealed roads in the western US, and so it did. When the Benchmark atlases got a bit vague the Nuvi led me out of the mountains, providing it was set up right and you took the suggested directions with a pinch of salt. Don’t know if it was my basic unit but I found that the full range of tracks around me would only display once a ‘Go to’ was set (a memory saving feature perhaps?). It meant I couldn’t scroll/zoom out to see the possibilities around me without a ‘go to’.
crgr-mountAlso, I was too lazy to address what I knew would be problem with vibration. Last year using a similar unit in Morocco I was smart enough to lay it on foam on the tank, this time with a cobbled together Garmin/RAM set up the vibration at higher revs caused it to cut out. I’ve since modified my home-made mount to incorporate a foam sandwich (above left) that may work better with future moto Nuvi-ing. Used Nuvis are cheap and easy to find on ebay; Garmin’s moto-focussed waterproof Zumo is not. You can buy waterproof pouches for a Nuvi to fit your bike.
Verdict: as long as it has worthwhile mapping, a used Nuvi is a good value nav aid.

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Old iPad $200 vs Macbook Air $600
I soon found that trying to update this website on the road from an iPad was frustrating, even with an accessory keyboard; WordPress have not got to the bottom of it. Luckily craigslist Phoenix had several used Macbook Airs within arm’s each. What a relief to get back to Mac’s laptop platform at about the same size and barely twice the weight of an iPad.
Verdict: a tablet to read but a laptop to write and edit. Nearly six years, many trips and a couple of dents later, I’m writing this in New Zealand on the same well-used airbook. What a brilliant machine!

Kriega R30 backpack – £135
crgr-kriegaI’m not so keen on tank bags but can’t fit all my essentials in my jacket so a backpack like the R30 takes the laptop and other valuables, sandwiches and quick access day items. Too heavy a backpack accelerates backside pain but the R30 rested on the Watershed when seated so took the weight off my shoulders.
Like a lot of Kriega stuff there’s some very clever but over-complex strap adjustment system that I never investigated; for me it fitted well enough out of the box. It includes a double clip joining the shoulder straps across the chest which along with the grippy mesh on the back helps keep it in place. On the back are cinch-down straps to stop a loose bag flapping. But when unclipped the chest clip arrangement doesn’t hang naturally off the shoulders when walking and who wants to walk around clipped in as if you’re ready to make a parachute jump. On the move I can’t say I ever noticed it which is the point and the capacity is expandable enough for all my needs; if not camping you could probably get a superlight touring load all in there.

crgr-kribakBest thing about it was a simple, zip-free roll-top closure which, unlike around-the-top zips, won’t matter too much if you forget to do it up – opened zips see stuff fall out. The small outside pockets do feature water-resistant zips which are a bit stiff to use, but then zips do need cleaning from time to time.
The R30 has a velcroed-in, removable waterproof liner which I hear is up to the job and easy to replace once it isn’t. Or just use your own dry bags. The chunky top handle is another good feature, the reflectives are probably useful and the quality of construction is what you’ve come to expect rom Kriega.
Verdict: expensive for a backpack but actually designed for biking not hiking.

crgr-liquidLiquid Containment 5L fuel bag – £60
I figured this was a compact way to inexpensively increase fuel range and rated fuel bags as such in the book: rolled up out of the way when not needed; handy when they are.
That may be true for the odd occasion when you need extra fuel, but I found a fuel bag was less well suited to near daily use on a motorcycle. The rot set in when the o-ring cap seal fell out and blew away unnoticed at a fill up in Vegas – didn’t notice that until that evening when everything reeked of 85 octane. A day or two later I picked up a replacement o-ring for a backstreet garage, but had gone off the bag by then.
crgr-canThe other pain on a bike is securing a wobbly bag of fuel reliably, securely and without faffing. Sure, the tough plastic LQ has holes on every corner but at a fuel stop you have to release the bag, prop it up, fill it up, cap it and then secure the load to the bike. If I had stuck with it I’d have found a good method, but these sorts of repetitive tasks need to be foolproof for the day you rush it and make a mistake.
Like scores before me, I found a red plastic $10 one-gallon can strapped  to the tail rack  better for near daily use. To fill up simply undo the cap, like an auxiliary fuel tank; to decant into the bike tank undo the straps, pour in and refit. A bigger tank in a worthwhile size was not available for the CRF-L at the time. Note; the fuel bag I used was not the same as the 7L item which Zen sell in the UK. Theirs is an older, bigger and superior model with an integrated pouring spout inside the cap and a handle.
Verdict: in practise not so convenient for regular use.

Maxxis IT Desert tyre – $110 
crgr-maxxisAmazingly the CRF-L’s OE rear IRC tyre was finished in 3000 miles – a record for me, and on a 18-horse 250, too! I found the meaty-knobbed Maxxis (like an MT21 or D606) was easy to fit with short levers and some WD40 lube, didn’t play up on the highway (bike not heavy or powerful enough to stress and flex the knobs) while on the dry and rocky dirt I rode at road pressures it did the business and I’m sure would have outlasted the IRC.
Verdict: performed as well as better known brands; a pair goes for <£100 on ebay.

crgr-camPanasonic Lumix FT2  – from £60 used
I’ve had this camera for a couple of years now and use it almost every day. When it was playing up recently I looked around but newer models in the FT range all had compromises (smaller battery, less megapixels, unnecessary gimmicks like GPS, expensive) as did other brands. So I got another old FT2 off ebay for £60 but which time my original camera had fixed itself.
What I like about Lumixes is they commonly feature wide-angle lenses (28mm or less)  over excessive zooms. An FT2 camera is also shockproof and waterproof to a few metres so rain or sand won’t bother it and it’s robust enough to survive ‘carefree’ treatment. Yes, the enclosed lens is tiny and the zoom is limited, but slipped into my jacket’s chest pocket and hung around my neck on a cord, it’s easy to use while riding. And just occasionally the auto exposure captures the scene as well as any DSLR. At other times – especially on full optical zoom, the quality drops off; better to shoot wide at max resolution and crop later (I always disable digital zoom).
With landscapes, a trick I use with these types of cameras all the time is half press the shutter and expose off the sky, then lower the camera, compose and click. The resultant ‘tricking’ into under exposure often gives a richer result (or one that can be more easily edited). I didn’t film on this trip, but have done a lot elsewhere and the results are up to youtubing. I even sold my annoying GoPro a while back and am now happy to use the FT2 for movie making. The tougher, DSLR-sized Gorillapod also works well as a steady tripod or clamp.
Verdict: until it wears out or breaks up, can’t think of a better P&S camera.

Riding gear
crgr-wearOn this trip to save weight I bought a lid once in the US (see Bell), wore my heavy leather trousers and old Altberg boots on the plane and brought my Aerostich Kanetsu electric vest to make up for my regular ‘M65’ desert jacket; no armour, Gore-tex, mesh or reflectives – just light, quick drying and with enough big pockets to make up for not being a Darien.
In the event of heavy rain I had my old Rukka one-piece suit, but never needed it. For gloves I has my similarly ancient unlined Aerostich Deerskins (sadly MIA) and a pair of Armr Moto WXP8 gloves for cold days. Apart from  the Rukka, all got used all or some of the time. Temperature-wise this trip was quite extreme but I felt protected enough to be comfortable, while never feeling over-laden with clobber, as you can do with moto gear.
Verdict: for the local conditions, the best set up I’ve ridden in.

SealLine XL map case – £15
I normally use this for sea kayaking or packrafting, the zip-lock seal keeps maps and other bits dry and the big size gives you the all-important big picture without the need to open up and refold a map too often as the crashing surf closes in. In the Southwest the map case took a folded back Benchmark with room to spare and stopped the crgr-benchpages flapping in the wind. I found a neat way of holding the maps case down was stretching a thin loop on inner tube from one side of the engine to the other (right). Note: they also make roll-top map cases, not as reliably waterproof as the zip lock version.
Verdict: moto or boto, great bit of kit.

Slime anti-puncture fluid and compressor (both $10)
crgr-slimerCan’t say the luridly green Slime fluid stopped any punctures on my ride, but for ten bucks it was worth the squirt. Also on the shelf in Walmart was a Slime-branded 12-volt compressor (right) also for a tenner and with a pressure gauge too and the ever useful flashing light. More compact and lighter than my Cycle Pump, I actually used the Slimepump a few times and it performed fine.
Verdict: well worth $20 for peace of mind.

crgr-screenSlipstreamer Spitfire windshield – $70 
Just what was wanted for the CRF; a small, inexpensive, one-size-fits-most screen to keep the wind and rain off. Mounting is a bit rudimentary but adds up to a quick, tool-free way of temporarily removing the screen while leaving the bar mounts in place, something I was slow to catch on to for dirt day rides when the screen was not needed.
With only two mounting rods (no triangulation) high-speed runs into headwinds or rough tracks caused the screen to inch back – this could have been fixed by anchoring the base of the screen to the headlamp cowling. It seemed hard to get a tight fit on the screw down screen mount lugs too, but meddling with spacers or rubber shims would fix this.
Verdict: Great value, simple fitting and effective.

trailtechTrail Tech Vapor digital guage – $90
A great gadget for a travel bike like the CRF-: with limited instrumentation. Click the link for full review.

Watershed Chattooga dry bag – £65
crgr-waterrAnother kayaking item that works well on bikes. Watershed dry bags use a tough fabric, but unlike your average roll-top bag, they feature a chunky ziplock-like seal that makes the bag immersion proof.
At about 20 litres the Chattooga model is compact but big enough to take my infrequently used tent, sleeping crgr-waterbag, sleeping mat and a spare pair of gloves. It didn’t happen on this trip but it’s good to know in heavy rain you need not worry at all about your camping gear getting wet until you take it out. For smooth closure the zip seal can use a bit of WD or 303 once in a while.
Verdict: Watershed when it absolutely positively has to be kept dry.

CRF Mile 2121: Moab and the White Rim Trail

Previously in SW USA: Death Valley, CA Trans Nevada
See also: White Rim Trail with KLX

Let me tell you, I’ve done my share of mind-blowing desert biking, seen attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion and all that stuff, but the WRT will be among the best 150 miles you’ll ever ride in a day.

You left me crossing into Utah trapped inside the lyrics of the Long-Legged Guitar Pickin’ Man. The rear tyre split hadn’t grown  and overnight in Cedar City the temperature dropped by over 30 degrees to less than 50F; good for tyre longevity. So I plugged in my Aero’ Kanetsu vest and took off up UT14 into the pines planning to follow 143 over the Cedar Breaks and down to Panguitch.

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Even before I got to the turn off it was getting on for 10,000′ but the CRF held it’s own. Altitude doesn’t really affect it – just strong winds and steep hills.
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But at UT148 junction the snow barrier was down.
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As I stopped, KTM man from yesterday in Pioche rocked up, this time on his Multistrada 1200, Ducati answer to the big GSs. Never actually seen one of these being used.
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On the far side at the roadhouse on 89 I tucked into my daily Subway against a warm sunny wall. I have convinced myself they’re a healthy form of cheap, fast food.
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Certainly healthier than these unidentified objects – battered lamb’s testicles on a stick?
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North now, into the fierce and freezing northwest wind. By the time I got smart and added another layer, my arms were quite numb from the cold.
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Did I say it was windy? The flags of the world do not lie.
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I stop off at Koosharen (pop. 327) for a one dollar coffee and a warm up.
‘Ain’t it cold on that li’l cikle?’ asked a man in a John Deere cap.
A small shed of his had just blown off down the road.
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Next day, out of Torrey on the edge of Utah’s Tourist Zone, but even here they have a Subbie! (There are no less than 40,000 franchises in 99 countries rtw). From here farming and mining takes a back seat to scenic drives past red rock cliffs and canyons.
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I follow the Fremont River after which the pre-Anasazi Indian culture was named. Their enigmatic petroglyphs adorn the canyon walls.
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I detour down the Goblin Valley Road and doze out of the wind and in the sun for an hour. Then I cut off along an old road that leads to Green River, avoiding unnecessary interstate.
I like these old roads with grass growing up through the cracks.
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At the back the snowy La Sal mountains rise to nearly 13,000′
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Green River has it’s own hooning hill. I like to think it helps reduce anti-social behaviour.

In Moab I score a cheap private cabin at the old Lazy Lizard hostel. I stayed here 20 years ago, but the Lizard has not responded to the ‘flashpacking’ boom; in Moab no one has. The Lizard is like an old style hostel, which is both good and bad. Then it dawns on me I’m in outdoor adventure central with a trail bike, cheap accommodation and time to spare; I better book up all the nights they got!

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I go rafting on the Colorado just out of town, in an IK alongside.
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Unfortunately this couple from SLC were in the IK for the best bit – rats!
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My cheap online Kenda tyre won’t be here for another few days so I buy a Maxxis Desert up the road for around $110 and leave it on the roof to soften up. It’s an old Indian trick.
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Then I go and rent an MTB and have a crack at the Slickrock Trail I remember well from ’94.
I don’t get so far – it’s got a lot steeper over the years; I blame erosion caused by global warming though other age-related scenarios are possible. But on a $2000, full-sus Santa Cruz SuperLight 29 with more traction than a gecko in a jam jar it’s a lot of fun.
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Creaking and screeching 4WDs share the Slickrock but not the same trail, although motos can ride the cycle trail.
In fact, the Trail was invented by motards back in the 60s. I wonder about coming back on the Honda, but even unloaded I don’t want to risk the clutch on some of the sudden, very sharp ascents.
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If you dig MTBs you must come to Moab for the Slickrock and all the rest.
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That split never grew in 500 miles but I still think the right flake on a dirt road would have nabbed the tube, Slime or no Slime.
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The Maxxis is a 110/100 – the worn OE was a 100/80, so new tyre is a bit taller but still black and round and on the road has been just as smooth and predictable.
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Even sun-warmed it’s a stiff tyre, but with technique and a bit of WD40 it slips on with just two levers.
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Time for a ride. I set out on a 90 mile loop, part of the UTBDR north of Moab.
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Up lovely Onion Creek with a dozen or more shallow fords to cool the feet.
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Then steeply up onto the La Sals at some 8000′. A bit chilly now and the over-sprung, shock chatters on the rocky ascents.
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La Sal – don’t know which one.
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Castle Valley, I do believe.
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Helmet-free riding is a rare pleasure, especially doing errands round town.
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And back east, down part of the MTB Kokopelli Trail and along easy Sand Flats Road past Slickrock where I detour for a quick one just to say I did it.
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In town I spotted this old 136cc 2wD Rokon on a trailer. Little changed from the 1960s, I think you could call that a ‘functional-brutalist’ design. They still make them today: rokon.com.
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It’s time to finally tick off the White Rim Trail. Twenty years ago I tried to rent an XL500 off Arrowhead to do the WRT but the guy was not so keen. Even today it’s hard to rent a road legal DS in Moab. Plenty of other OHV stuff to be had if you have a trailer or a ute.
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The weather was not so good; it had rained overnight, hopefully enough to settle the sand and dust but not turn it into mush.
I saw a few bolts of lightening through the day but only got rained on for a few minutes.
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At the end of Mineral Bottom Road is the big drop to the Green River valley.
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A plucky MTBer takes the last big climb after 3 or 4 days on the WRT.
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From then on it was kind of sandy, but only for 200 yards at a time. No rain dampening here so to be on the safe side I paddle laboriously. I hoped it wasn’t a 100 miles of this…
How do these MTBers manage?
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At times you’re right by the river; lose the front and you’ll make a splash. Elsewhere you climb ‘inland’. I think it was the sandy climb up Hardscrabble Hill that made me glad I wasn’t towing luggage. I actually stopped and looked back over my shoulder at the 1 in 2 sandy hairpin on the way down and thought, cripes, that would have been hard to get up.
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I’ll let a few pics do the talking…
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At the top of another long climb, possibly Murphy Hogback around Mile 70, I meet a guy on a fully loaded 1150. And I mean fully loaded like he was going to Alaska. And on Anakee tyres too…
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I didn’t know it then but I’d nearly completed the harder, sandier half of the WRT which he was heading into. I warned him about Hardscrabble Hill and doubted that tank would make it. but he seemed a confident rider.
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The 1150 is a speck at the bottom of the photo.
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Soon after I turned back north at the halfway piint: White Crack turn off, I stopped to fill up and finish off my footlong Sub. Someone had advised not to bother with this side – I presume because it’s easier?
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But that suited me just fine at that stage; I was riding more fluidly after the morning’s efforts and the spectacles kept on coming, now with the Colorado River on my right.
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I reached the Shafer Trail turn off about 5pm; the Trail seemed to disappear into the cliffs. Many had raved about the Shafer Trail.
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So I rode up to the top; Island in the Sky.
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And coasted back down to keep the pads warm in the evening chill.
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I learned later that I’d passed under the rim of Dead Horse Point where Thelma and Louise took their fateful leap, gunning their T’bird into the abyss, yelling “You’ll never take us alive!”. For a Hollywood movie, that was a great ending.
I continued along the Potash Road, 30 miles back to Moab; a bit rough, or I was starting to feel the miles by now.
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The mining works after which the road is named were originally a regular mine. Then they adapted it to effortless ‘solution mining’ by dissolving the subterranean potassium out with the aid of brine, pumping it up and then allowing the water to evaporate and the minerals to crystalise in shallow ponds.
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Blue dye is added to help the solar process. They separate the salt from the potassium later.
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I rode back into town nine hours after setting out, just as another deluge got ready to drop its pants over Moab.

Let me tell you, I’ve done my share of mind-blowing desert biking, seen attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion and all that stuff, but the WRT will be among the best 150 miles you’ll ever ride.

I’m now waiting for the weather to clear before heading down through Canyonlands’ Needles District and on to the AZ border. It seems the temps are about to take another 20°F hike up the scale.

Adios Moab. Last episode here.